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Finding Narnia at the British Museum September 21, 2013

Posted by ccbooks in Nerd Line.
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What do you do when the museum you’re at is insanely crowded and you can’t see over the heads of all the tourists to the cool artifacts?

If you’re me and Ana, you wander toward less crowded spaces, look at random cases and start talking about children’s books. And as we made our way through the vast labyrinth of the British Museum, we started to see a few items that looked familiar. Had we read about them? Not exactly. But more than one object made us think of the Narnia series, and we started trying to recall others. Here is what we came up with. Now I want to try and do the same thing with a museum here in DC!

Susan's horn! From PRINCE CASPIAN and WARDROBE. From around the year 1100, Savernake Forest, in England.

Susan’s horn! From PRINCE CASPIAN and WARDROBE. From around the year 1100, Savernake Forest, in England.

The bracelet that turns Eustace into a dragon in DAWN TREADER. Late Bronze Age, from Buckinghamshire, England.

The bracelet that turns Eustace into a dragon in DAWN TREADER. Late Bronze Age, from Buckinghamshire, England.

Peter's sword! From WARDROBE and PRINCE CASPIAN. It was made around 1250 in England or Germany.

Peter’s sword! From WARDROBE and PRINCE CASPIAN. It was made around 1250 in England or Germany.

In PRINCE CASPIAN, finding a stray chessman is a clue that the Pevensies have found their way back to Narnia. These are some of the Lewis chessmen, from medieval Scotland.

In PRINCE CASPIAN, finding a stray chessman is a clue that the Pevensies have found their way back to Narnia. These are some of the Lewis chessmen, from medieval Scotland.

Finding Lucy's diamond bottle of healing cordial from WARDROBE proved difficult. The best we could do was this cruet set from London, 1878. We probably would have had better luck over at the V&A.

Finding Lucy’s diamond bottle of healing cordial from WARDROBE proved difficult. The best we could do was this cruet set from London, 1878. We probably would have had better luck over at the V&A.

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