jump to navigation

Review: The Night Gardener May 21, 2014

Posted by ccbooks in Book Reviews.
trackback

nightAre you a fan of The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman or Splendors and Glooms by Laura Amy Schlitz? Are you looking for a new book to love and re-read ten times, and recommend to all your friends? Look no further than The Night Gardener  by Jonathan Auxier, coming out this May from Amulet Books.

It starts with a time-honored historical fiction set-up: two children have run away from the orphanage and are on their way to find a job until their parents come for them. This is Victorian England, there is famine in Ireland and jobs are scarce for immigrants. Kip, the younger brother, has a lame foot and walks with a crutch. Molly, the older sister, is a storyteller who claims that the ‘sourwoods’ they are heading towards are made of lemon trees and lemon blossoms. And once they make it through the trees and across the river (ignoring the advice of the wandering storyteller Hester Kettle), they meet their employers, the Windsor family.

Once at the Windsor house though, strange sounds, sights and stories begin to unfold and we are in the world of twisted dreams and family legends. You see, there is a tree. A giant tree close to the house, it’s “…gnarled trunk running up the wall like a great black chimney stack.” Why do no flowers or grass grow near it? Why does each member of the family have a collection that they hoard and where do the rings, letters and candies come from? Molly and Kip must summon all their cunning and courage to confront their own dreams and desires. They must figure out the difference between a story and a lie and figure out how, when stories turn evil and come to life, they can be defeated.

Auxier pulls no punches for the reader, rendering the tree and it’s ghostly gardener in harrowing detail. Molly and Kip are sympathetic protagonists and there are surprises to discover in the characters of each member of the Windsor family. Hester Kettle the storyteller presides over the narrative like a slightly twisted fairy godmother, telling truths and giving gifts. This is a book where the historical and the supernatural twist together perfectly to form one seamless thread of story and the layers in the narrative mean it will satisfy a wide range of ages. For readers who love the shivers, this will be the perfect bedtime read-aloud, while for those of us who prefer to face ghosts by daylight, it will be a new favorite to return to again and again.

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: