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Three Septembers and a January August 8, 2014

Posted by ccbooks in Book Reviews.
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With apologies to Neil Gaiman for stealing one of his titles from Sandman, here are four ARCs I’ve read recently that I can’t wait to share with readers:

deafoEl Deafo by Cece Bell (September)

This is without a doubt my favorite graphic novel of the year so far. When she was four years old, an illness left Bell with limited hearing and she had to wear a hearing aid to school. As she struggles to make friends, explain the hearing aid and find a way to fit in, she creates the character of ‘El Deafo’ a superhero with extra-sensitive hearing. And although the hearing aid gives her some embarrassing moments, it also leads to some triumphs. This was a funny, inspiring and flat-out fantastic read.

Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire (September)

eggMaguire combines Russian folktales and his own special brand of wit and whimsy in this tale of two girls–one rich, one poor–and their encounters with a prince, a Firebird, an ice dragon and the indomitable Baba Yaga. With lush descriptions that never overwhelm the story, laugh-out-loud asides from ‘Miss Yaga’ and quiet wisdom about heroism and choices, this is a near-perfect read. A great title to pair with Splendors and Glooms by Laura Amy Schlitz or The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier for readers who want a mix of mystery, fantasy and history.

Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson (September)

loveI was a huge fan of Johnson’s YA debut The Summer Prince when it came out last year and I’m even more impressed by this thriller set in Washington DC. Emily Bird is a student at Devonshire Academy, whose mother insists on academic and social perfection. But she would rather hang out in Northeast with her uncle and cousin, dream of opening a small store and–maybe–get to know Coffee, the Brazilian non-conformist who just might be in love with her. But with a government agent lurking who is convinced Bird knows dangerous secrets, and a deadly flu virus ravaging the city, Bird must figure out how to take control of her future. This one is for readers who like mysteries, thrillers, love stories–really, for anyone who loves a  great read.

The War that Saved my Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley (January)

warIt’s not out until January. But I just finished this new title by the author of Jefferson’s Sons and I am in love with it. This is the perfect read-aloud for kids who love the American Girl doll Molly and it will also please fans of World War II YA fare like Code Name Verity.  Ada is ten, but has never been able to walk or leave her house because of a clubfoot she has had from birth. Her mother is ashamed of her disability and abuses both her and her little brother Jamie. But when the war comes and Jamie is sent away to the country, Ada follows and slowly learns to walk, to trust others and to believe in herself.  With excellent period details, a spy story, horses and strong emotional resonance, this book will please just about everyone.

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Latino Book Challenge August 2, 2014

Posted by ccbooks in Book Reviews.
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I have given myself several book-related challenges this year. As a bookseller, I resolved to stop asking whether customers were purchasing for a boy or girl and instead focus my queries on gender-neutral characteristics like genre or other books the child has enjoyed. As the We Need Diverse Books campaign ramped up in May, I started trying to make sure I read at least two diverse titles every time I do a story time for the bookstore. And since January, I’ve been trying to keep track of all the Latino books I read for the Latinos In Kid Lit challenge.

The challenge is simple: read at least one book by a. a Latino author or b. about a Latino character each month. This challenge will go in a slightly different direction once I leave for South America later this month, but here are some favorites that I’ve read so far:

fire

Fire! Fuego! Brave Bomberos by Susan Middleton Elya, illus. by Dan Santat

For any child who loves fire engines or firefighters, this is a fantastic read aloud with lots of Spanish mixed into the story. My preschool students loved it and played firefighters enthusiastically after listening.

paleta

What Can You Do With a Paleta? by Carmen Tafolla, illus. by Magaly Morales

Beautiful illustrations and an imaginative storyline about a sweet treat for the summer. Even if your reader isn’t familiar with a paleta they will enjoy finding all the little details in the pictures. It will probably also make you hungry.

roja

Little Roja Riding Hood by Susan Middleton Elya, illus. by Susan Guvara

I love fairy tale retellings and this, along with the new Ninja Red Riding Hood is one of my favorites. Lots of Spanish mixed in, but the familiar storyline will help readers figure out the meanings. Great illustrations as well.

separate

Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh

A non-fiction picture book about the court case that integrated schools in California in the late 1940’s. Sylvia Mendez was told she had to go to the ‘Mexican school’ despite being an American citizen and speaking perfect English. Her family fought back with a lawsuit and won, establishing an important precedent for the more familiar Brown vs. Board of Education case. Tonatiuh’s text is a great read aloud and the pictures are vibrant and engaging.

caminar

Caminar by Skila Brown

This is possibly my favorite title here. In a poetry format, Brown tells the story of a boy in Guatemala in the 1980’s, whose entire village is killed in an attack by government forces. All along, he must climb a mountain to find his grandmother and warn her village of the danger. Beautifully written and with a sensitive author’s note, this book shines light on a piece of history almost always neglected by US history classes. A gem.