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Latino Book Challenge August 2, 2014

Posted by ccbooks in Book Reviews.
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I have given myself several book-related challenges this year. As a bookseller, I resolved to stop asking whether customers were purchasing for a boy or girl and instead focus my queries on gender-neutral characteristics like genre or other books the child has enjoyed. As the We Need Diverse Books campaign ramped up in May, I started trying to make sure I read at least two diverse titles every time I do a story time for the bookstore. And since January, I’ve been trying to keep track of all the Latino books I read for the Latinos In Kid Lit challenge.

The challenge is simple: read at least one book by a. a Latino author or b. about a Latino character each month. This challenge will go in a slightly different direction once I leave for South America later this month, but here are some favorites that I’ve read so far:

fire

Fire! Fuego! Brave Bomberos by Susan Middleton Elya, illus. by Dan Santat

For any child who loves fire engines or firefighters, this is a fantastic read aloud with lots of Spanish mixed into the story. My preschool students loved it and played firefighters enthusiastically after listening.

paleta

What Can You Do With a Paleta? by Carmen Tafolla, illus. by Magaly Morales

Beautiful illustrations and an imaginative storyline about a sweet treat for the summer. Even if your reader isn’t familiar with a paleta they will enjoy finding all the little details in the pictures. It will probably also make you hungry.

roja

Little Roja Riding Hood by Susan Middleton Elya, illus. by Susan Guvara

I love fairy tale retellings and this, along with the new Ninja Red Riding Hood is one of my favorites. Lots of Spanish mixed in, but the familiar storyline will help readers figure out the meanings. Great illustrations as well.

separate

Separate is Never Equal by Duncan Tonatiuh

A non-fiction picture book about the court case that integrated schools in California in the late 1940’s. Sylvia Mendez was told she had to go to the ‘Mexican school’ despite being an American citizen and speaking perfect English. Her family fought back with a lawsuit and won, establishing an important precedent for the more familiar Brown vs. Board of Education case. Tonatiuh’s text is a great read aloud and the pictures are vibrant and engaging.

caminar

Caminar by Skila Brown

This is possibly my favorite title here. In a poetry format, Brown tells the story of a boy in Guatemala in the 1980’s, whose entire village is killed in an attack by government forces. All along, he must climb a mountain to find his grandmother and warn her village of the danger. Beautifully written and with a sensitive author’s note, this book shines light on a piece of history almost always neglected by US history classes. A gem.

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